Past events

Mapping Cultures
Saturday 08 November 2014, 11:00am - 04:00pm
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This multidisciplinary workshop/conference aims to bring together anthropologists, geographers, cartographers, archaeologists, linguists and digital media specialists to explore and discuss the interconnections between different mapping technologies.

Mapping indigenous lands to secure tenure, manage natural resources, and strengthen cultures is a recent phenomenon. A variety of methodologies have made their appearance, ranging from highly participatory, community-led approaches involving village sketch maps to more technical efforts with geographical information systems (GIS). Data Visualization is the study and practice of turning data into content that is capable of being quickly understood. In short, it is a process of designing data.

Data design has become an expanding industry in today's information society. Through visual presentations, talks and exhibitions, participants will explore contemporary case studies that look at space, landscapes or spatial relationship of cultural elements (such as languages, music etc.).

The conference, films and exhibitions will explore topics such as:

  • What is the role and significance of space in people’s lives?
  • How has mapmaking been used by ethnographers in the past and present?
  • What is the role of human spatial behaviour, orientation, way finding and environmental perception?
  • Where are the comparative differences between western cartographic maps and indigenous mapping techniques?
  • How do individuals and societies produce mental maps and spatial practice?
  • How have past projects in the humanities successfully linked with digital technologies?
  • Do different genders perceive their own spatial communities or environments differently?
  • What is the feedback from UCL’s ongoing ‘Extreme’ Citizen Science (ExCiteS) project on Geographic Information Systems for Non-literate Users?
  • Many anthropologists have found themselves at the centre of disputes about land rights. How have they used the results of their own research and new research methodologies to help give a voice to marginalized people and help their defend or regain stewardship over their ancestral lands?

This event is free but places must be booked at http://esrc-mapping-cultures.eventbrite.com

 

Location 5