Many people from all over the world are affiliated to the RAI. We welcome anyone with an interest in the subject, whether working in an academic institution or not. Our affiliates include academic specialists, students, those working in fields where anthropology has practical applications, and those whose interest is captured by the subject matter of anthropology. The membership structure has been designed as far as possible to suit all interest groups. The RAI is constantly looking for ways of improving its structure and services, and welcomes all suggestions.

You can go straight to the application form here.

In this section you can find links and information about anthropolgy organisations and events in the UK and the rest of the world.

http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&ll=37.0625,-95.677068&spn=175.67563,360&t=h&z=1

In this section you can find links and information about anthropology organisations and events in the UK and the rest of the world.


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VacancyLink - Vacancies advertised under Anthropology Today

Vacancies advertised in Anthropology Today are included here after the issue in which they appear has gone to press. See our rates for further information.  Are you in a hurry? If you cannot wait for the print issue, we can still feature you in this column. In our rates' page search for "Rates for web-only adverts" and contact us via email. Please mention Anthropology Today when responding. The adverts below are classified by deadline order.

CourseLink - Courses advertised under Anthropology Today

Courses advertised in Anthropology Today are included here after the issue in which they appear has gone to press. See our rates for further information.

Are you in a hurry? If you cannot wait for the print issue, we can still feature you in this column. In our rates' page search for "Rates for web-only adverts" and contact us via email. Please mention Anthropology Today when responding. The adverts below are classified by deadline order.

193.WBF.49.50.24.4The RAI administers a number of trust funds from the income of which it is able to award Fellowships at postdoctoral level in partnership with host universities, and limited financial support to postgraduate students of anthropology. The Institute also has honours, medals and prizes at its disposal, which are awarded in recognition of achievement of the highest order in anthropology. Details are listed on these pages. Enquiries should be addressed to the Office Manager.

Those research grants administered by the Royal Anthropological Institute are advertised regularly in Anthropology Today the Institute's bi-monthly journal.

The RAI is involved in two Fellowship schemes. These are hosted not at the RAI, but at appropriate institutions in the United Kingdom and Ireland.

Prizes awarded by the Royal Anthropological Institute

The Institute awards nine prizes, four of which are in the field of ethnographic film. These are advertised regularly in Anthropology Today, the Institute's bi-monthly journal.

The Royal Anthropological Institute has six honours and distinctions at its disposal. These awards are announced in Anthropology Today.

032.WBF.49.50.12.1The Royal Anthropological Institute organises occasional one day conferences on specific topics.  In June 2012 we launched our major conference programme with Anthropology in the World. This was followed by Anthropology and Photography in May 2014, Anthropology, Weather and Climate Change in May 2016 and Art, Materiality and Representation in June 2018. Our next conference will be on Anthropology, Geography and Movemnent and will take place in June 2020.

 

Royal Anthropological Institute / British Museum Centre for Anthropology

ANTHROPOLOGY IN THE WORLD

BRITISH MUSEUM, CLORE CENTRE, 8th to 10th JUNE 2012

The Royal Anthropological Institute is pleased to announce that a conference ‘Anthropology in the World’ will take place at the British Museum, Clore Centre, in conjunction with the BM Centre for Anthropology. The aim of this conference is to explore the manifold ways in which anthropology in its widest sense has been influential outside academia. It is aimed therefore at having a widespread appeal to the general public and to those anthropologists who are working in careers outside the university. We hope too that it will be of interest to academic anthropologists who are interested in the way that their subject is diffused and used in wider society, and to those students who are interested in applying their anthropological skills outside the academic arena.

You can view a short film about the conference here.  You can also view Gillian Tett's keynote lecture here.

anthropology_in_the_world_poster

 

timetable:

Call for Panels opened: 17th August 2011; Call for Panels closed: 28th October 2011

Call for papers opened: 11th November 2011; Call for papers closed: 16th January 2012.

Registration opens 14th February 2012.

Conference Fee:

Non-Fellow: £170
RAI Member: £150
RAI Fellow: £90
Concessions: £70
RAI Student Fellow: £50

With thanks to our sponsors for their contributions;

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bm_logo

meg

 

Royal Anthropological Institute Student Conference

This year, the annual RAI student conference comes to Durham, combining with their regular student conference. Panel spaces at the conference are open to students of all levels and there are multiple other ways to get involved. If you are interested, please respond to the call for papers by 6 March 2017.
 
For any more details contact raidurham17@gmail.com or benjamin.m.hildred@durham.ac.uk.

Some say we are living in a ‘post-truth’ world, punctuated by the ‘shocks’ of Brexit and Donald Trump’s election, heated debates over the ‘migrant crisis’, climate change, and vaccines, where expertise is ignored and ‘objective fact’ surrenders to emotion and belief. If so, what might ‘post-truth’ mean for anthropology? We believe it urges us to reconsider how anthropology examines people in both a socio-cultural and evolutionary context; to reflect on the evidence underpinning such ideas, and the purposes of the knowledge we generate. In light of the multi-disciplinary nature of Durham Anthropology, and the spirit of our 70/50 Anniversary celebrations, we invite undergraduate and postgraduate students from all sub-disciplines of anthropology to reflect on their work in this ‘post-truth’ world. In doing so we hope to examine the purpose, place and possible roles of anthropological knowledge and of anthropologists within it, and seek a wider exploration of the notions of ‘truth’ and ‘expertise’. By combining the diverse approaches anthropologists’ use, we seek to construct a method of speaking more clearly to one another, and in doing, speak more clearly to the wider world.

SUBMISSION OF PROPOSALS FOR PAPERS, POSTERS AND AUDIO/VISUAL MEDIA

We welcome proposals that emerge from (but are not limited to) the following themes:

  • Reflections on anthropology's role(s) in the world
  • Examinations of knowledge and expertise
  • Considerations of conspiracy, rumour and 'truthlessness'
  • Evolutionary understandings of human behaviour
  • Rethinking modes of anthropological dissemination and engagement (e.g. collaborative research)
  • Knowledge and 'truth' in human/non-human cognition
  • Opportunities/obstacles for intervention and activism
  • Patient interaction with/rejection of medical knowledge(s) and practices
  • Critical perspectives on human rights, social/environmental (in)justice, resource extraction, food security/sovereignty, health, and ill-being

We especially welcome submissions that speak across anthropological sub-disciplines.

Submit your proposals with your name, institution, email address, title and abstract (300 words max) to raidurham2017@gmail.com

Submission deadline 6 March 2017
Acceptance notification 20 March 2017
Registration deadline 1 April 2017
Registration fee £10

Paper based on on-going research (e.g. dissertations and theses).  Please state if you would like to be considered for either a seven or fifteen minute slot.

Poster about your current or proposed research. To be displayed throughout the event, with a social session dedicated to presentations.

A/V media to be exhibited in a format that will be anounced closer to the conference. Submit a trailer or taster with your abstract.

 

Past Conferences

RAI First Annual Postgraduate Conference - Durham University, 20 September 2011, a Special Edition of the Durham Anthropology Journal is dedicated to the conference. This can be read here.

Breaking Bubbles: Anthropology for our Future (RAI Undergraduate Conference) - University of Kent, 3-4 March 2012

RAI Second Annual Postgraduate Conference - University of Kent, 13 September 2012

Closer Encounters: Bringing Anthropology Home (RAI Undergraduate Conference) - University of St Andrews, 12-13 April 2013

RAI Third Annual Postgraduate Conference - University of Aberdeen, 28-29 October 2013

RAI Fourth Annual Postgraduate Conference - Brunel University, 3-4 September 2014

RAI Fifth Annual Postgraduate Conference - University of Manchester, 4-5 June 2015

RAI Sixth Annual Student Conference - Oxford Brookes University, 18 May 2016

RAI Seventh Annual Student Conference - Durham University, 20-22 April 2017

British Museum, Clore Centre, 29-31 May 2014

The Royal Anthropological Institute is pleased to announce that a conference ‘Anthropology and Photography’ will take place at the British Museum, Clore Centre, in conjunction with the museum’s Department of Africa, Oceania and the Americas. The aim of the Conference is to stimulate an international discussion on the place, role and future of photography.  Panel proposals are therefore welcome from any branch of anthropology.

Call for Panels and Papers

We welcome contributions from researchers and practitioners working in museums, academia, media, the arts and anyone who is engaged with historical or contemporary production and use of images.

Panels can draw upon (but are not limited to) the following themes:

  • The use of photography across anthropological disciplines
  • The changing place of photography in museums and exhibitions
  • Photography and globalisation
  • Photography, film and fine art
  • Revisiting and re-contextualising archival images
  • Photography and public engagement
  • Ethics, copyright, access and distribution of images
  • Technological innovation and its impact
  • Regional photography practices
  • Visual method and photo theory

The call for panels opens on 1 August 2013 and closes on 31 October 2013

The call for papers opens on 27 November 2013 and closes on 8 January 2014

 

Conference Fee:

Non-Fellow: £170
RAI Member: £150
RAI Fellow: £90
Concessions: £70
RAI Student Fellow: £50

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With thanks to our sponsors for their contributions;

British Museum

Wenner-Gren Foundation

 

ROYAL ANTHROPOLOGICAL INSTITUTE AND THE DEPARTMENT OF AFRICA, OCEANIA AND THE AMERICAS OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM

Anthropology, Weather & Climate Change

The RAI is delighted to announce a major conference entitled "Anthropology, Weather and Climate Change" which will take place at the British Museum, 27-29 May 2016, organized in conjunction with the BM Department for Africa, Oceania and the Americas. We welcome proposals for panels on all aspects of this timely and complex issue.

Anthropology is understood here as being in its widest sense, including Archaeology, Biological Anthropology, Linguistic Anthropology and Social Anthropology.

A Climate Change Hub website has been developed following the conference.

 

Call for panels opens on 27 February 2015 and closes on 30 June 2015

Call for papers opens on 28 August 2015 and closes on 18 January 2016

Registration opens on 22 February 2016


Conference Fee:

Non-Fellow: £180
RAI Member: £160
RAI Fellow: £95
Concessions: £75
RAI Student Fellow: £50

With thanks to our sponsor:

The British Museum

ROYAL ANTHROPOLOGICAL INSTITUTE, THE DEPARTMENT OF AFRICA, OCEANIA AND THE AMERICAS OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM AND THE DEPARTMENT OF ANTHROPOLOGY AT SOAS

Art, Materiality and Representation

BRITISH MUSEUM/SOAS 1st-3rd JUNE 2018

The conference was jointly organised by the RAI, the BM’s Department for Africa, Oceania and the Americas, and the Department of Anthropology at SOAS and held in the Clore Centre of the British Museum and the SOAS Paul Webley Wing of Senate House.

Informal enquiries may be made to admin@therai.org.uk

Call for panels opened on 21 April 2017 and closed on 30 June 2017

Call for papers opened on 29 August 2017 and closed on 8 January 2018

Registration opened on 22 February 2018 and closed on 3 June 2018


Conference Fee:

Non-Fellow: £190
RAI Member: £170
RAI Fellow: £95
Concessions: £80
RAI Student Fellow: £60

With thanks to our sponsors:

The British Museum

SOAS

 

Royal Anthropological Institute Directory of Fellows

Welcome to the RAI Online Directory of Fellows. The Directory allows you to to search amongst all current RAI Fellows, see their academic and research details, and contact them.  This can be done by entering specific searches or using the Browse feature.

The RAI Fellows represent collectively an unrivalled body of knowledge and practical expertise on diverse anthropological themes and regions of the world, and many also undertake appropriate consultancy work upon request.

In order to contact any Fellow, please click on the envelope next to their name, and a dialogue box will appear which will permit you to send an e-mail.

To proceed to the Royal Anthropological Institute Directory of Fellows please click here.

 

 

Note to Fellows

Fellows automatically appear in the directory.  If you wish to be excluded, contact the membership manager and your details will be removed.  If you are a Fellow and you do not appear in the directory, it could be because your membership is in arrears. Again, please contact the membership manager.

Certification of forensic practitioners in the UK has gained momentum in recent years although it has proven to be more challenging to achieve for the independent practitioner. This is true for the discipline of forensic anthropology and to address this, the British Association for Forensic Anthropology was formed in 2011. This association has undergone an intensive period of standard setting and validation in partnership with the Royal Anthropological Institute as its professional body. The RAI has a Forensic Anthropology Committee whose main role is to provide oversight of the professional certification process.

The work to date has included the development of:

The certification process aims to provide two things; a transparent, fit-for-purpose guide to end users on the required skill set of the forensic anthropologist and a career pathway for the forensic anthropology professionals of the future. The certification process and its development will be presented within the framework of appropriate scientific quality standards now being demanded by the Forensic Science Regulator and the criminal justice system in the United Kingdom.

Certification of forensic anthropologists in the UK are separated into 3 categories which permit police, judiciary or other clients to select a level of experience that is suitable for their needs and to identify geographically local capabilities.

  • Forensic Anthropologist I - The highest level of certification. These are highly experienced practitioners who have court room experience.
  • Forensic Anthropologist II - This level includes practitioners who have evidenced competence in both their practical and theoretical knowledge of forensic anthropology. They may not yet have given evidence in a courtroom but they will be mentored by an FAI to assist them in this regard.
  • Forensic Anthropologist III - The practitioners in this level have evidenced that they have some experience and knowledge in the field of forensic anthropology. They may not have yet had real field experience of a case but they will be mentored by either an FAI or an FAII practitioner.

A list of those already certified as FAI is available here

A list of those already certifies as FAII is available here

A list of those already certified as FAIII is available here

Forensic Science Regulator legal guidance

If you have any additional queries, please communicate these to the examination board via the email address fac@therai.org.uk.

 

Downloads for University course curricular mapping certification

Guidance and Application

Curriculum Map Excel Sheet

 

Forensic Anthropology Events

RAI Research Seminar: Caroline Wilkinson

RAI Research Seminar: Lucina Hackman

Scottish Student Forensic Research Symposium

bafa logo

These pages list vacancies in anthropology published in the RAI’s journal Anthropology Today; and opportunities for short-term attachment to the RAI as a Visiting Scholar. To post a vacancy announcement in Anthropology Today, contact atadverts@gmail.com.

Benefactor's Board © RAI

The RAI is an entirely independent charity which has been in existence for nearly 150 years, thanks to the generosity of its benefactors. Donations and legacies allow us to sponsor cutting edge anthropological research, which is hard to finance by other means. Our benefactors also enable us to give much needed funds to help final year research students complete their PhDs, give out prizes for outstanding scholarship and conserve our invaluable archival, photo and film collections for future generations. We welcome any contributions, large or small, towards these endeavours. We also welcome contributions to our fundraising for our future flagship project, the creation of an RAI Research Centre. Anthropology is a discipline that tackles issues of universal concern such as ‘human nature’, gender and sexuality, health, nutrition, indigenous rights, globalisation, multiculturalism and development. It has a key role to play in the education of globally informed citizens, as well as practical applications in areas such as government, medicine, tourism, international aid and law. We believe its continued practice is of vital importance.

If you are interested in giving us a donation, or leaving us a gift in your will, we would love to hear from you. Enquiries can be made in confidence to the Director, Dr David Shankland on david.shankland@therai.org.uk, +44 (0)20 7387 0455, 50 Fitzroy Street, London, W1T 5BT.

More specific information about leaving us a gift in your will is available here.

Of course, one of the best ways to support us is to join as a Member or Fellow of the Institute and play an active part in our community. For more information about joining us visit our Joining pages. With donations over £2000 you have the option of a Life Fellowship of the RAI gratis, so that you can keep in touch with us and our work. Fellowship includes print and online subscription to our journals, the Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute and Anthropology Today, as well as reduced admission to RAI events and free access to the archives.

What could your gift achieve?

Your donation or legacy could contribute to the charitable work of the Institute in various ways.

Books © RAI

A gift of £50 could purchase a book for the Anthropology Library held at the British Museum. The Anthropology Library is free and open to members of the public for reference. RAI Fellows can borrow books. The library is one of the largest and broadest collections of anthropological reference materials in the world. The RAI Librarian, Ted Goodliffe, TGoodliffe@britishmuseum.org, can offer advice on new acquisitions.  Donations from anthropologists – either of their own works or larger quantities of material, are also always greatly appreciated. Please contact Ted to discuss suitability.

 

The Fagg Library © RAI

A gift of £200 could purchase a day of an archivist’s time to help assist the Royal Anthropological Institute’s Archivist and Photo Curator, Sarah Walpole, with the important task of archiving and digitalising our extensive collections. This is an area where support is always appreciated and can make a significant difference. We have several important collections in need of archiving, as well as thousands of rare photographs in need of digitisation. These collections are not just of importance in terms of historical record, but can have direct contemporary relevance, for example we are currently revisiting the work of our blood group research committee from the 1950s (Mourant).

Donations allow us to expand the proportion of collections easily accessible to researchers. For example, an endowment trust is currently paying for an archivist to catalogue and make available to the public the collections of W.B Fagg in the Fagg Library held on the premises.

A gift of £500 could enable us to offer a travel bursary for a filmmaker to attend our biennial RAI Film Festival.

RAI Archivist Sarah Walpole at the RAI Oral History Day © RAI

A gift of £1000 could enable us to buy much needed equipment to assist the work of the Archivist and Photo Curator, for example specialist equipment to process larger scale items such as ethnographic drawings and maps.

 

 

 

 

 

Breaking the Chains Q and A with Director Erminia Colucci at the RAI © RAI

A gift of £3000 could sponsor a dedicated seminar series, or themed film screening series.

 

 

 

 

 

Visual anthropologist Martha-Cecilia Dietrich Ortega at work in the Peruvian Andes © Andy Lawrence

A gift of £5000 could sponsor a small research grant, enabling a researcher to conduct a piece of contemporary and relevant fieldwork that they are unable to finance by other means. For example, a gift is currently allowing us to sponsor an exploratory research trip to the Caucasus, Armenia by an anthropologist working in collaboration with the World Land Trust, to explore the impact of conservation programmes on local communities. 

 

 

A gift of £25,000 could provide an Urgent Anthropology Fellowship, which focuses on research on disappearing indigenous cultures, languages, and ecologies. This unique scheme, privately funded by anthropologists (founding sponsor: Dr George Appell) has been running since 1995. For a list of past Urgent Anthropology Fellows and their work click here.

A gift of £200,000 would enable us to offer a new initiative of a fully costed post-doc Fellowship for three years, based at the Institute. With opportunities for full time paid academic positions increasingly restricted for PhD graduates, a contribution to this scheme could make a real difference. The RAI has an emphasis on facilitating publicly engaged anthropology and applications to the scheme would be required to demonstrate the contemporary relevance and importance of their project.

Radcliffe-Brown’s war census record © RAI

A gift of £2,000,000 could create an endowed fund for anthropological research. Endowed funds are when the capital of the gift is invested and produces an annual income for a specific activity. Endowed funds have been essential to the ongoing existence and work of the Institute. Notable endowments include the Radcliffe Brown Trust, Emslie Horniman Anthropological Trust, and the Esperanza Trust which support anthropological fieldwork and research at various levels. For more information about our research grants see here.

A gift of £10.000,000 would enable us to create a new RAI Research centre. This is part of a long-term vision of the Royal Anthropological Institute to create an independent space to allow for cutting-edge, publicly relevant and timely research.  

Igun & Eku Street dance, Urhobo. Okpara. c.1949-50. Photograph by W.B Fagg © RAIThe RAI runs an active programme of academic publication in anthropology. It publishes the Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute, Anthropology TodayAnthropology and Photography and Teaching Anthropology, and sponsors book and other publications from time to time. It also publishes the Anthropological Index Online.

Winner of the 2009 Material Culture and Archaeology Film Prize: Shot in Cameroon and Brussels, 'Je ne suis pas moi-même' explores the world of African antiquities and the contradictions in a European art market hungry for new tribal objects. Where do the African masks come from? What journey do they make before their unveiling in fancy galleries or art collections in Europe? Who determines their value? © Alba Mora & Anna Sanmarti (film distributed by the RAI)Ethnographic film, and visual anthropology more generally, have a well-established position within the discipline’s mainstream. The RAI acts as contact point in the UK for information, networking and advice in visual anthropology, organises film screenings and lectures, and provides a base for international visitors. In addition it supplies a service based on the acquisition, hiring out and sale of ethnographic films, videos and DVDs for educational and academic purposes. The RAI’s ethnographic film library is one of the world’s largest and most important. New titles are added on a continuing basis to both the sales and the archive reference holdings. All films submitted for inclusion are screened by the specialist Film Committee, guaranteeing a standard of excellence unparalleled elsewhere. Growing numbers of film company researchers and broadcasters now consult the RAI film materials. RAI Film Festival is held biennially.

Subscribe to our mailing list - weekly events listing & news from the world of visual anthropology

 

 

RAI244.2007.306.1 Closing Ceremony, RAI Festival Manchester 2007,copyright RAI

RAI FILM FESTIVAL
anthropology – ethnography - archaeology

The 15th RAI Film Festival will take place from Wednesday 29 March to Saturday 1 April 2017 at the Watershed Cinema in Bristol, United Kingdom. It is supported by The Center for Visual Anthropology, Department of Anthropology, Dornsife College, University of Southern California.

The Festival will showcase a selection of films competing in five prize categories.
(RAI Film Prize; Basil Wright Prize; Student; Material Culture and Archaeology; Intangible Culture: Music-Dance-Performance).

Parallel events will include curated sidebars, workshops and master classes, with particular emphasis on student filmmaking. The work of Jean Rouch on the centenary of his birth will be celebrated.

Film submissions will open in July 2016 and close in late September 2016.
https://raifilm.org.uk/

The RAI International Festival of Ethnographic Film is held biennially with the first edition held in 1985. Host institutions in the past have included Leeds Met University, University of Manchester, University of Oxford, University of Durham, University of Kent at Canterbury, Goldsmiths College, SOAS, University College London and University of Edinburgh. In 2015 the Festival was for the first time held at the Watershed Cinema in Bristol.

The film festival normally extends over four days and is organised jointly by the Film Committee of the RAI and a host institution. Some host institutions have organised a conference on a theme related to ethnographic film or visual anthropology more broadly, in association with the festival.

Filmmakers throughout the world are invited to submit films for screening during the festival and for the various prizes and awards administered by the RAI.

Further information and rules & conditions for film submission will soon be posted on the dedicated RAI Festival website https://raifilm.org.uk/ or see the following downloads for our festival:

For any enquiries please contact: Caterina Sartori, Film Officer & Festival Manager, Royal Anthropological Institute, 50 Fitzroy Street, London W1T 5BT, United Kingdom; email; phone: +44 (0)20 7387 0455.

In this section you will find study guides and a selection of film related web links.

The Institute has a Film and Video Library from which items may be borrowed within the UK.  You can find a list of the films available for hire here.

An on-line version of The Royal Anthropological Institute Film Catalogue, Vol. I, including detailed descriptions of films and bibliographical entries, is partially available on-line here.

A full electronic version of The Royal Anthropological Institute Film Catalogue, Vol. II, including detailed descriptions of films and bibliographical entries, is available on-line here.

Please note: a new RAI Video Sales site is under construction and will go live soon.

The RAI distributes over 300 DVD and video titles for educational use. The holdings below are arranged in alphabetical order by title, except when the titles begin with the words The or A, whereupon the dvds/cassettes are alphabetised by the following word. Student films, and staff films from the Granada Centre for Visual Anthropology are listed in separate sections. Pricing and ordering information is given below.

Titles are distributed world-wide except where otherwise indicated. Please get in touch for alternative distributors if not indicated.

For latest updates and new titles please see New Additions or contact the Film Officer.

A Sámi male, Salomon Hedriksen Pilto. Lainiovuoma. Photograph by R. Bonaparte, 1884. RAI445. © RAIThe RAI photographic library is unique. Consisting of over 75,000 historic prints, negatives, lantern-slides, drawings, paintings and other images, the earliest of which date from the 1860s, it provides a scholarly service to a large number of academic researchers, students and responsible commercial users.

It contributes strongly to public awareness of the RAI, and provides a practical interface between the Institute and a wide range of audiences and disciplines. The anthropology of visual culture is becoming increasingly central to the discipline as a whole, and interest has correspondingly grown. The material contained in the photographic library is highly relevant to contemporary, as well as historical, concerns.

From time to time, the photographic library provides a focus for exhibitions, events and publications of interest to visual anthropologists and historians of anthropology. Enquiries should be addressed to the Archives Officer.

The Royal Anthropological Institute of Great Britain and Ireland (RAI) is the world's longest-established scholarly association dedicated to the furtherance of anthropology (the study of humankind) in its broadest and most inclusive sense. The Institute is a non-profit-making registered charity and is entirely independent, with a Director and a small staff accountable to the Council, which in turn is elected annually from the Fellowship. It has a Royal Patron in the person of HRH The Duke of Gloucester KG, GCVO.

The Institute is a non-profit-making registered charity and is entirely independent, with a Director and a small staff accountable to the Council, which in turn is elected annually from the Fellowship.  A list of the past Presidents is available here.  You can find a list of current Council members here.

Specialist interests in anthropology are represented through Committees.  A list of current Committees can be found here.

If you are interested in joining the Royal Anthropological Institute and receiving the journals please go to the Joining section.

If you are interested in hiring or purchasing a film please go to the Film section.

If you are interested in finding a photograph for publication or exhibition please contact the Archivist.

If you are interested in ordering photocopies of an item from the archives please contact the Archivist.

If you are interested in a customised bibliography from the Anthropological Index Online please contact the AIO.

If you are interested in Educational brochures please go to the Education Publications section.

If you are interested in Occasional Papers please go to the Occasional Papers page.

You can see the Annual Reports in full by clicking on the pdfs.

PDF (2 MB)

The Anthropological Index Online (AIO) is a comprehensive, user-friendly online bibliography of anthropology-related journals held in the Anthropology Library and Research Centre at the British Museum, London. It provides an indispensable service for libraries and for individual researchers, teachers and students of anthropology and archaeology throughout the world. Supported for many years by grants from the W.B. Fagg Charitable Trust, the AIO now aims to be financially self-sustaining. For full information and to access the Index, click here.

The Anthropological Index Online (AIO) proudly announces a new service for its users. As of January 2012, anyone using AIO will be able to search for RAI films online via keywords, directors or area of coverage. Default searches will show simultaneously both articles and films. Users will have the choice of searching films only. Film titles will be marked with a distinctive icon that identifies them among articles appearing on the same page. This new service is the result of a collaborative project between AIO and the Film section of the RAI that aims at highlighting its resources among fellows, subscribers, and independent users. Film lists will be updated twice a year.

Anthropological Index Online designed by Peter Jones, LPS

Ajalorun of Ijebu Ife, Ijebu Ife, 1949-50. Photograph by W.B. Fagg.  Copyright of the RAI.

 

 

Access to the AIO is currently free to individual users. Institutions (except those in developing countries) are asked to pay a subscription. The subscription fee is currently £315 plus VAT per year in the UK and EU or US$550 per year overseas.

Many libraries have been regular subscribers for years. We trust that individual anthropologists as well as librarians and institution heads will continue to support this scheme and that institutions who are not yet subscribers will see a benefit in joining the service.

Yes, I would like to subscribe

I cannot myself authorise an institutional subscription, but I will place it before our Librarian or Head of Information Resources

The data is © Copyright RAI and use is permitted for educational non-commercial purposes (including private study). Commercial institutions wishing to use Anthropological Index Online are asked to contact the RAI to arrange access.


 

Fon sculpture at Chief Justin Aho, male & female figures. Abomey. c.1949-50. Photograph by W.B Fagg © RAIThe RAI is the custodian of a rich collection of unpublished archival and manuscript materials, most of which is available to bona-fide scholars for research purposes. Enquiries should be addressed to the Archives Officer.

The policies and guidelines for the Archives and Manuscripts department can be found here.

The list below is classified by alphabetical order.

The list below is classified by alphabetical order. You can also view the full list by reference order. All material produced within the most recent thirty years has been omitted from this website, and there may be restrictions on viewing certain items. Please consult the archivist for further detail.


The RAI online obituaries project comprises biographical essays covering the life and work of deceased and distinguished anthropologists—usually though not necessarily RAI Fellows. RAI obituaries are designed to provide basic information about the deceased (name, dates and places of birth and death, affiliations, major publications, immediate survivors) for the record, as well as more personal remembrances, and to serve as a scholarly resource and RAI archive. The project is supervised by the Manuscripts and Archives Committee. RAI obituaries are solicited by the Obituaries Editor and published on the Institute’s website. This page is the Institute’s major portal for information about deaths of our colleagues. As a service to the Institute, please notify the RAI Obituaries Editor Nichola Khan at N.Khan@brighton.ac.uk as soon as you learn of a death. Suggestions for possible obituarists are welcome.

Please click on a name below to read the obituary.


An excellent biographical resource by Alan Macfarlane featuring interviews and films of notable deceased and living anthropologists may be found via the following link http://www.alanmacfarlane.com/ancestors/anthropology.htm

Fagg CollectionThese pages list events run by the RAI, or to which the RAI contributes substantively. For information on events in anthropology run by other organisations worldwide, click here.

The Royal Anthropological Institute’s Education programme, Discover Anthropology, has been set up to develop actions and strategies to inform teachers and young people about anthropology as a university subject, and to bring the subject more generally into pre-university education. Anthropology, the study of what it means to be human across different societies, cultures and histories, is not currently taught in schools and colleges in the UK and compared to other social sciences, anthropology undergraduate degrees attract fewer students from widening participation target groups. Yet the discipline of anthropology has a distinctive, and vital, contribution to make to understanding the world today. Anthropology offers a deep understanding of how different societies work, how people live, their beliefs, customs, ideas, prejudices and aspirations.  In an era when global understanding and recognition of diverse ways of seeing the world are of critical social, political and economic importance, anthropology has a central role to play in education.

The Discover Anthropology education programme aims to 1) provide good quality accessible information for students considering studying anthropology at university 2) to create a series of regular events and activities for young people and teachers and 3) produce resources for teachers that draw upon the insights of anthropology. The programme will be represented by a dedicated website shortly. From 2005-2006 the programme was funded through the AimHigher National Activity programme.  From 2007-2010 the programme will be funded by the Economics and Social Research Council.

For more information please contact our Education Officer.

 

Anthropology: looking for something to doThe Royal Anthropological Institute’s Education programme, Discover Anthropology, has been set up to develop actions and strategies to inform teachers and young people about anthropology as a university subject, and to bring the subject more generally into pre-university education. Anthropology, the study of what it means to be human across different societies, cultures and histories, is not currently taught in schools and colleges in the UK and compared to other social sciences, anthropology undergraduate degrees attract fewer students from widening participation target groups. Yet the discipline of anthropology has a distinctive, and vital, contribution to make to understanding the world today. Anthropology offers a deep understanding of how different societies work, how people live, their beliefs, customs, ideas, prejudices and aspirations. In an era when global understanding and recognition of diverse ways of seeing the world are of critical social, political and economic importance, anthropology has a central role to play in education.

The Discover Anthropology education programme aims to 1) provide good quality accessible information for students considering studying anthropology at university 2) to create a series of regular events and activities for young people and teachers and 3) produce resources for teachers that draw upon the insights of anthropology. The programme will be represented by a dedicated website shortly. From 2005-2006 the programme was funded through the AimHigher National Activity programme. From 2007-2010 the programme will be funded by the Economics and Social Research Council.

For more information please contact our Education Officer.

 

A. P. Maudslay in the Southern Chamber, Casa de Monjas, Youcatan. RAI490. © RAI

The Anthropology Library and Research Centre, located within the British Museum, incorporates the original Library of the Royal Anthropological Institute (RAI) and the British Museum’s Ethnography Library, and is effectively Britain’s national anthropology library. The RAI contributes substantially to Library acquisitions and staffing. International exchange arrangements are also in place with scholarly institutions, under which the Library receives publications in exchange for RAI journals.

The Library is open to the public for reference and research. RAI Fellows have the special privilege of being able to borrow books from the library. Fellows are encouraged to make use of the Library’s wide ranging resources. The online catalogue can be searched here

Both the RAI and the Museum’s Department of Africa, Oceania and the Americas host seminars and other events in the Library. The Department’s Collections Enquiries service is also located within the Library.

Library opening hours are 10.00-17.00 Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday and 12.00-17.00 on Thursday.

The Collection

The Library’s holdings comprise more than 120,000 books and pamphlets and 4,000 journal titles, of which around 1,500 are current. The journal collection, which is indexed by the Anthropological Index Online, is particularly strong for Latin America, Eastern Europe, Africa and Asia. The Library also contains maps, newsletters, reports and a significant pictorial collection.

Geographically the scope is worldwide, with particular emphasis on the Commonwealth, Eastern Europe and the Americas, notably Mesoamerica. All aspects of anthropology are covered: cultural (with an emphasis on material culture) and biological anthropology, archaeology and linguistics, together with related fields such as history, sociology, description and travel.

Fellows and Members are encouraged to make use of the Library’s wide ranging resources at the Anthropology Library and Research Centre at the British Museum.

Staff

Ted Goodliffe is the RAI's Library Officer and attends the Library on two days a week. Please contact him if you wish to discuss or comment on any aspect of the Library's services or policies or if you have any bibliographic or information enquiries. For urgent matters in his absence please contact the Senior Librarian, Jan Ayres.

RAI's Library Officer: Ted Goodliffe Telephone: +44 (0)20 7323 8067 Email Ted Goodliffe

Senior Librarian: Jan Ayres Telephone: +44 (0)20 7323 8069 Email Jan Ayres

A.P. Maudslay in the Southern chamber, Casa de Monjas, Yucatan. RAI copyright.

The Anthropology Library and Research Centre, located within the British Museum, incorporates the original Library of the Royal Anthropological Institute (RAI) and the British Museum’s Ethnography Library, and is effectively Britain’s national anthropology library. The RAI contributes substantially to Library acquisitions and staffing. International exchange arrangements are also in place with scholarly institutions, under which the Library receives publications in exchange for RAI journals.

The Library is open to the public for reference and research. RAI Fellows have the special privilege of being able to borrow books from the library. Fellows are encouraged to make use of the Library’s wide ranging resources.

The online catalogue can be searched here.

Both the RAI and the Museum’s Department of Africa, Oceania and the Americas host seminars and other events in the Library. The Department’s Collections Enquiries service is also located within the Library.

Library opening hours are 10.00-17.00 Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday and 12.00-17.00 on Thursday.

Electronic Resources

The Library is increasingly purchasing material in electronic format as well as hard copy. At present the electronic resources collection is still in its developmental stage, but already comprises a substantial number of reference works and some journal titles. This development will allow Fellows both on-site and remote access to a selection of the Library’s resources and, by rationalising purchases, will enable the Library both to effect budgetary savings and to offer a much wider range of material.

The Anthropology and the Environment Committee of the RAI have put together a list of anthropologists who are interested in environmental issues.  This list is a resource for other anthropologists and for those outside anthropology looking for a particular expertise.

If you are interested in being included please reply to admin@therai.org.uk and include:

  • Name
  • Affiliation
  • Contact details
  • Statement of interest
  • Geographical/topical area of interest

Privacy Notice for Royal Anthropological Institute

This will be updated from time to time as appropriate.