RAI research seminars– Half a Century of Anthropology: 50 Years of Published Research

You can see the full presentation here.

This document collates data produced for a test study on the research ‘50 years of Anthropology’, which started in 2013 through a generous British Academy grant received by the Anthropological Index Online. The research aimed at giving an overview of anthropological production in the world over time so as to identify topical gaps and illustrating trends and foci of regional interest.

The research was based on a qualitative and quantitative examination of the articles published in specialised literature indexed AIO from 797 journal titles in anthropology and related disciplines held in its databases.

This document is the second of two presentations and an article that cumulatively give a sense of the coverage of anthropology. Selected criteria were applied in sieving through 50 years of data, and for methodological and practical purposes researchers concentrated on specific topics that were published in different language areas.

The purpose of the following presentation was to examine the extent of specialised interest on Islamic countries through a qualitative assessment of anthropological production. 

It summarises a test case study about anthropological production related to four Asian countries: Brunei, Kazakhstan, Pakistan and Oman.

Manchester presentation for the 17th World Congress of the International Union of Anthropological and Ethnological Sciences (IUAES)

You can see the full presentation here.

This document collates data produced for a test study on the research ‘50 years of Anthropology’, which started in 2013 through a generous British Academy grant received by the Anthropological Index Online. The research aimed at giving an overview of anthropological production in the world over time to identify gaps and illustrating trends and foci of regional interest.

The research was based on a qualitative and quantitative examination of the articles published in specialised literature indexed AIO from 797 journal titles in anthropology and related disciplines held in its databases.

This document is the first of two presentations and an article that cumulatively show the fluctuations of interest in specific anthropological topics about different parts of the world. It summarises a test case study about anthropological production related to Great Britain that was presented at the 2013 Manchester conference of the 17th World Congress of the International Union of Anthropological and Ethnological Sciences (IUAES).

The presentation generated great public interest and guided the researchers in their thinking about the issues professional anthropologists raised about the aims and objectives of this project.  

50 Years of Anthropology - A British Academy Funded Project

You can see the full report here.

The nature of the Index means that many of the articles we incorporate would be difficult to find via other means such as through Google Scholar or similar search engines, so in many ways the AIO gives a clear and the most complete picture we can hope for of what anthropologists have been discovering for the last 50 years.

The project is the first of its kind to begin delving into what we know and don’t know so much about in anthropology, and what it means to be an anthropologist today. We have only scraped the surface of what has been happening in anthropology for the last 50 years, yet we have already demonstrated some of the intriguing avenues worthy of more inquiry. The AIO is a great way to help you plan lessons, research essays and answer questions about just about anything from what the Romans did in Britain, to why we use money to buy things, and how people survive in extreme climates. The beauty of anthropology is that it touches on everything you could wonder about humanity and the Index is a safe, easy to use portal into learning more about ourselves and the world around us.

AIO Projects

This section contains documents related to projects undertaken by AIO. It started in 2015 to offer a space where users can find information that complements the live searches on AIO.

Conceived to be an efficient and comprehensive use of AIO data, individual projects highlight the potentials of this immense database that give selective snapshots about anthropological production. In each of these special projects AIO’s thousands of articles are combined through different criteria to show how a bibliographic database can be more than a list of articles about specific topics.

In this section you will find downloadable items. AIO projects comprise internally produced, as well as externally funded projects such as the 2013 research: Anthropological Production in the World: Data Collection and Analysis, financed by a generous grant by the British Academy.

Among the projects in this section AIO will regularly upload: charts regarding research output, percentages about topical coverage, statistics concerning keywords fluctuations, national profiles, customised bibliographies (e.g. about individual authors, or specific aspects of anthropology), and language coverage (e.g. how much has been produced in a given language, or lists of articles about specific topics only in one language etc.).

Subcategories

Ajalorun of Ijebu Ife, Ijebu Ife, 1949-50. Photograph by W.B. Fagg.  Copyright of the RAI.

 

 

Access to the AIO is currently free to individual users. Institutions (except those in developing countries) are asked to pay a subscription. The subscription fee is currently £315 plus VAT per year in the UK and EU or US$550 per year overseas.

Many libraries have been regular subscribers for years. We trust that individual anthropologists as well as librarians and institution heads will continue to support this scheme and that institutions who are not yet subscribers will see a benefit in joining the service.

Yes, I would like to subscribe

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The data is © Copyright RAI and use is permitted for educational non-commercial purposes (including private study). Commercial institutions wishing to use Anthropological Index Online are asked to contact the RAI to arrange access.